Congratulations to the 14 students who graduated from the Porter-Billups Leadership Academy this week.
We’re proud to continue our partnership with the Porter-Billups Leadership Academy founded by Regis basketball coach Lonnie Porter and hometown star Chauncey Billups. #thisisregis High-res

Congratulations to the 14 students who graduated from the Porter-Billups Leadership Academy this week.
We’re proud to continue our partnership with the Porter-Billups Leadership Academy founded by Regis basketball coach Lonnie Porter and hometown star Chauncey Billups. #thisisregis

The Sacred Heart statue on the North Denver campus has seen a lot over its 120-plus years. Positioned in the middle of the quad in front of Main Hall, it was installed when the University was named College of the Sacred Heart. The John Brisben Walker family, the same family to donate the then farm land to the Jesuits, funded the statue’s creation.

The devotion of the Sacred Heart, symbolized in the statue, is one of the most well-known Roman Catholic devotions, taking Jesus Christ’s physical heart as a representation of his divine love for humanity. While the statue symbolizes the faith and tradition from Regis’ past, if you ask most Regis grads what they know about the statue, most mention a common characteristic. The statue’s missing right hand has been surrounded in folklore, with numerous stories as to how the right hand went missing.

On May 12, work began to restore the statue back to its original glory. Ken Phillips, assistant to the vice president for mission and art, and Mike Redmond, associate vice president of Physical Plant, are leading the project with the help of Jack Kreutzer, the Loveland sculptor who created many of the other Regis statues on the North Denver campus. Kreutzer will work to make an exact replica of the statue to be replaced by fall 2014. Work will also commence on restoring and placing the original statue in an indoor alcove in Carroll Hall, where it will remain, hands intact, for years to come.