Autism expert. Animal behavior expert. Cattle management expert. Author, activist, speaker – and autistic. Regis recently welcomed one individual who fits all these categories, and who managed to discuss them together, in front of a crowd of more than 430, in a way that made perfect sense. Dr. Temple Grandin, the focus of an Emmy-winning HBO biopic named after her, addressed a standing room-only crowd in the St. John Francis Regis Chapel this week. Her talk, “Different Kinds of Minds,” brought together autism, animal behavior, neurodiversity, and much more, eliciting both laughter and thoughtful contemplation from audience members.
Grandin, named one of Time magazine’s most influential people in the world, was diagnosed autistic when she was a child. Through a combination of intensive therapy, mentoring, low-dose medication and a mother who consistently pushed Temple out of her comfort zone, Grandin went from not speaking until age 4 to her current status as an internationally-recognized expert on both autism and animal behavior.
In her discussion at Regis, Grandin pointed out that it’s individuals on the autism spectrum who lend a different way of thinking to the world, enabling humanity to achieve things like the latest in mobile phone technology, space exploration, energy efficiency, and countless other achievements. She described her own thinking as being identical to “Google Images” – when asked to recall an object, like a church steeple, she sees specific ones from specific incidents in her lifetime. That sort of thinking, as well as the mathematical, verbal, pattern-based and other types exhibited by individuals on the autism spectrum, is a valuable asset in today’s world, she said.
Grandin also emphasized the need for both early treatment and engagement for children with autism, and a specified approach to each individual so that their strengths are emphasized. All autistic individuals must be taught social skills, she said. They must be stretched, pushed out of their comfort zones, in order to grow andfunction in society. Despite the seriousness of her talk, she sparked laughter and smiles when she showed a picture of a group of scientists and proclaimed, “I’m sure there are some Asperger’s in there” – referring to Asperger syndrome, an autism spectrum disorder.
In a more personal moment, Grandin shared a meal with several Regis faculty and staff members prior to her public talk, including Regis’ Dr. Laurie Sperry, Program Coordinator for Early Childhood Education and Regis’ Autism Certificate Program. There she discussed everything from the latest in the cattle industry to Pope Francis to her favorite television show. It’s Discovery Channel’s Mythbusters – what else?
Read on for more about Regis’ Autism Certificate Program within the College for Professional Studies. High-res

Autism expert. Animal behavior expert. Cattle management expert. Author, activist, speaker – and autistic. Regis recently welcomed one individual who fits all these categories, and who managed to discuss them together, in front of a crowd of more than 430, in a way that made perfect sense. Dr. Temple Grandin, the focus of an Emmy-winning HBO biopic named after her, addressed a standing room-only crowd in the St. John Francis Regis Chapel this week. Her talk, “Different Kinds of Minds,” brought together autism, animal behavior, neurodiversity, and much more, eliciting both laughter and thoughtful contemplation from audience members.

Grandin, named one of Time magazine’s most influential people in the world, was diagnosed autistic when she was a child. Through a combination of intensive therapy, mentoring, low-dose medication and a mother who consistently pushed Temple out of her comfort zone, Grandin went from not speaking until age 4 to her current status as an internationally-recognized expert on both autism and animal behavior.

In her discussion at Regis, Grandin pointed out that it’s individuals on the autism spectrum who lend a different way of thinking to the world, enabling humanity to achieve things like the latest in mobile phone technology, space exploration, energy efficiency, and countless other achievements. She described her own thinking as being identical to “Google Images” – when asked to recall an object, like a church steeple, she sees specific ones from specific incidents in her lifetime. That sort of thinking, as well as the mathematical, verbal, pattern-based and other types exhibited by individuals on the autism spectrum, is a valuable asset in today’s world, she said.

Grandin also emphasized the need for both early treatment and engagement for children with autism, and a specified approach to each individual so that their strengths are emphasized. All autistic individuals must be taught social skills, she said. They must be stretched, pushed out of their comfort zones, in order to grow andfunction in society. Despite the seriousness of her talk, she sparked laughter and smiles when she showed a picture of a group of scientists and proclaimed, “I’m sure there are some Asperger’s in there” – referring to Asperger syndrome, an autism spectrum disorder.

In a more personal moment, Grandin shared a meal with several Regis faculty and staff members prior to her public talk, including Regis’ Dr. Laurie Sperry, Program Coordinator for Early Childhood Education and Regis’ Autism Certificate Program. There she discussed everything from the latest in the cattle industry to Pope Francis to her favorite television show. It’s Discovery Channel’s Mythbusters – what else?

Read on for more about Regis’ Autism Certificate Program within the College for Professional Studies.

Guess which university had the most students chosen to share writing at the National Undergraduate Literature Conference this year? Hint: it wasn’t an Ivy League school.
Regis University continued its impressive showing at the conference with 18 English majors and minors accepted to present their scholarly or creative writing in 2014. That’s after having 13 chosen last year.
The conference was held April 3-5, at Weber State University in Ogden, Utah, and welcomed literature students and professors from across the country. Participants couldn’t help but notice the rather large contingent from a rather small school in Colorado.
“It was really interesting and exciting to have so many Regis students at the conference,” said Wren Craig, a junior double majoring in English and peace and justice studies. “I think it says a lot about our department. It shows that we have a department-wide commitment to quality academic and creative work, and that we have incredibly supportive professors who encourage us to put our work out into academia.”
Mark Bruhn, professor of English, believes that Regis’ considerable presence speaks not only to the quality of the department, but most importantly, to the caliber of its students.
“We might just be the proudest department on campus, and for all the right reasons – our students’ success!” High-res

Guess which university had the most students chosen to share writing at the National Undergraduate Literature Conference this year? Hint: it wasn’t an Ivy League school.

Regis University continued its impressive showing at the conference with 18 English majors and minors accepted to present their scholarly or creative writing in 2014. That’s after having 13 chosen last year.

The conference was held April 3-5, at Weber State University in Ogden, Utah, and welcomed literature students and professors from across the country. Participants couldn’t help but notice the rather large contingent from a rather small school in Colorado.

“It was really interesting and exciting to have so many Regis students at the conference,” said Wren Craig, a junior double majoring in English and peace and justice studies. “I think it says a lot about our department. It shows that we have a department-wide commitment to quality academic and creative work, and that we have incredibly supportive professors who encourage us to put our work out into academia.”

Mark Bruhn, professor of English, believes that Regis’ considerable presence speaks not only to the quality of the department, but most importantly, to the caliber of its students.

“We might just be the proudest department on campus, and for all the right reasons – our students’ success!”

The rumors are true. Something delicious is brewing at Regis. In the fall, we will become the first in the region to offer a certificate in applied craft brewing, educating current and future craft brewers in #Denver – the heart of the industry – in the biology and business of brewing beer. #Craftbeer #CObeer #thisisregis  (at Regis University) High-res

The rumors are true. Something delicious is brewing at Regis. In the fall, we will become the first in the region to offer a certificate in applied craft brewing, educating current and future craft brewers in #Denver – the heart of the industry – in the biology and business of brewing beer. #Craftbeer #CObeer #thisisregis (at Regis University)